50th Birthday Wish

A note from TRCP’s Ed Arnett:

Greetings all,

One of the things I really like about the TRCP family is sharing our great experiences on public lands hunting and fishing.

I’m down off the mountain for a day and wanted to share one of the more special moments in my life as a hunter.  This is my cousin, Larry Lanter and I after he took his very first buck and first mule deer on public lands in Wyoming.

Wyoming Muley

Sharing a great experience on a public lands hunt. Photo by Ed Arnett.

There are too many stories to tell, but there was snow, extreme mud, lots of hiking and a little drama at the end with an evening hit on the deer that yielded a tracking exercise this morning.

It took me two hours — often on my hands and knees looking for blood and the right tracks — to track him down, but we found him! He’s no monster wall-hanger, but a magnificent trophy for a first time mule deer hunter, and fair chase on public lands.

Larry and I are one month apart in age and both turned 50 this year (don’t look a day over 49 though now do we…) and this was our treat and wish for the half-century mark. My main goal was to get him a buck and I’m so happy as this is the first time he and I have hunted big game together.

I wanted to share the moment with my TRCP friends.  Also, notice our headgear. We’re promoting as we tour Wyoming!  Now we’re off to hunt pronghorn.

More later,

ea

 

Caption Contest via ‘The Utah Bucket List’

The fine folks working on “The Utah Bucket List” posted the following photo on their Facebook page. Post your caption below. We will send the winner a book bundle including TRCP favorites, “MeatEater, Adventures from the Life of an American Hunter” and “Last Stand: Ted Turner’s Quest to Save a Troubled Planet.”

Submit your best caption by Friday. We will announce the winner at noon EDT.

Happy captioning!

 

 

 

Wednesday Win: Fill in the Blank

Can you name the catalog that is featuring Mia?

Our Oregon Field Representative Mia Sheppard can be found on page 38 of ____________ Fishing Products. Name the catalog she’s featured in, and we will send you the first season of Steven Rinella’s “MeatEater.”

Send your answers to info@trcp.org or post a comment on the TRCP Blog by Friday.

 

Wednesday Win: Photo Caption

For this week’s “Wednesday Win,” we’re going back to our roots. Leave a comment on the blow photo of TRCP’s co-founder and compass, Jim Range, and we’ll pick our favorite on Friday. The winner will receive a TRCP camo hat.

Photo by Steve Belinda.

Wednesday Win: Caption Contest

For this week’s “Wednesday Win” we’re holding a caption contest for the photo below. Leave a comment and we’ll pick our favorite on Friday, Nov. 30. The winner will receive a TRCP camo hat.

Photo by Neil Thagard.

Wednesday Win: Guess the TRCP’er

We’re throwing some vintage TRCP your way for this week’s Wednesday Win. Check out this blast from the past photo of one of our staffers, and see if you can guess who it is. If you need clues, visit our staff page for a comprehensive list of staff members and current photos. If you answer correctly, you could win a Gigantic Book of Hunting Stories.

Submit your answer via our Facebook page, email us at info@trcp.org or leave a comment on the TRCP Blog. Due to the Thanksgiving holiday, we will announce the winner on Monday, Nov. 26.

Wednesday Win: Caption Contest

For this week’s “Wednesday Win” we’re holding a caption contest for the photo below. Leave a comment and we’ll pick our favorite on Friday, Nov. 9. The winner will receive a TRCP camo hat.

Photo by Tom Franklin

Wednesday Win: Moose Crossing

We’ve been hard at work here at the TRCP. Already this fall we wrapped up a successful Western Media Summit and are in the final planning stages of our Saltwater Media Summit. We’ve also been working hard to get a Farm Bill passed in 2012 and are formulating a strategy for educating new members of Congress about the importance of conservation after the election in November.

Every now and again we like to take a break from all the work to have some fun. And because we want you to join in on the fun, we are kicking off “Wednesday Win.” It’s a chance for you to win great prizes from the TRCP and take a short break from whatever keeps you busy.

For this week’s “Wednesday Win” we’re holding a caption contest for the photo below. Leave your best comment below. We’ll pick the best comment on Friday, Sept. 28. The winner will receive a  hand-tied, commemorative Bully Bugger framed and ready for display in your home or office.

Check back every Wednesday for your chance to win.

Photo by Geoff Mullins.

 

 

 

Fishing A High Desert River

Malheur Country, Ore. Photo by Mia Sheppard.

Southeast Oregon high desert is rugged and compelling country with over 4 million acres for the public to access. From the breaks of the Owyhee and Malheur Rivers to the rugged mountains of the Oregon Canyon Mountains, the topography is rich with sagebrush and native grass ecosystems supporting abundant wildlife.

Big game such as mule deer, California big horn sheep, Rocky Mountain elk, pronghorn, as well as upland birds such as sage grouse, chukar, California quail and native trout are present here.

Redband trout. Photo by Mia Sheppard.

The redband trout population in the Malheur River is thought to be derived from the Columbia Basin redband trout when a lava flow isolated the basin from the Malheur River drainage 8,000 to 10,000 years ago.

I set out to explore the countryside and fish the rivers for trout. After hours of driving, a dusty stretch of road emerges where there’s no fence line blocking an entry to the river. It’s almost dark, and I set up camp and fall asleep to the sound of the river at my feet.

The call of a western meadowlark wakes me up at 5 a.m., reminding me of my childhood days in church listening to the choir hum Amazing Grace. I rise out of bed, brew some coffee, and change my fly to a subsurface beadhead because the river is moving fast and the visibility is about two feet.

The Malheur River. Photo by Mia Sheppard.

The bank is green with tall native grasses; I analyze the river, determining where a fish might lie. There’s a small pool whirling behind rocks and a soft seam hugging the bank. My first cast is to the grassy cut bank. I make a cast up stream, strip the line fast to stay with the current, take a couple steps up stream and cast again.

To find an aggressive fish, I keep covering the water. My next cast is behind a rock where the current is moving at a considerable pace. The trout explodes; cart wheeling and breaking the surface. She’s strong, pulling, not giving in. After a few minutes I get her to the bank, remove the hook and release her back to the cool waters of the high dessert. This is what I came here for.

Experiences such as this keep me coming back and fuel my enthusiasm to see these special places conserved for future generations. I’m proud to be working to ensure the conservation of these resources through my work with the TRCP.

Sign up here to follow more stories such as this.

Photo by Mia Sheppard.

Mia Sheppard is TRCP’s Oregon field representative. She lives in Brightwood, Ore., with her husband and daughter. In her free time, she fishes for steelhead and trout throughout the Pacific Northwest.

Photo: A Hard Working Girl Gets A Redfish

Laura Morris Redfish

We received the following photo submission from Laura Morris,  the PR coordinator for the Union Sportsmen’s Alliance. Laura wrote, “Here’s what I was doing on my vacation! This was my first-ever redfish.” Congrats Laura!

Submit your photos on the TRCP Facebook page or send them to info@trcp.org. The winner will receive a “MeatEater” DVD!